How Do You Get Your Start in Global Health?

People get into global health a variety of ways. I especially admire Dr. Paul Nanda’s entry into global health because he discovered his passion in the middle of his family medicine residency. For those of you who don’t know too much about medical training—it is not very flexible. This is a story of someone who made a decision, became the first family practice resident at The Ohio State University to do an international rotation and then went on to found and head the Global Health Education Department for Family Medicine at the same institution.

Watch the interviews on my Vimeo Channel: http://vimeo.com/channels/pitchforksoptional

In TWO jam packed interviews we cover:

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How can you make food policy accessible? A: Start with a casserole!

A HUGE thank you goes out to everyone who came to the first Charm City Casserole Cook-Off! Not only were the entries stupendous–but we had wonderful judges (Monyka Berrocosa, Linda Rittleman, Ms.Dorothy Peace and Ms. Juanita Garrison) and photography provided by Sulakshana Bhattacharya. Becky Kuk gave everyone the scoop on Whitelock Community Farm and some of the participants got to walk down the street to see the Farm first hand.

Check out the pics here.

Down load the winning recipes!

Sweet Potato Casserole-Judges Pick

Holy Mole Pie-Crowd Favorite and Kid’s Choice Winner

We’ll let you know when you need to get your ovens revving for the Charm City Casserole Cook-Off so stay tuned!

Skpe Series with Pitchfork Holders

I am embarking on an exciting project which I am pretty sure you will love. Over the next few months you will be getting a chance to see what it takes to change the universe. I’m interviewing passionate change makers in health*.

These people are going to blow you away with their honesty and detailed notes on how they got to where they are today. In order to make it feasible to get all the juicy details, the interviews will be posted into two jam packed sessions. The first interview will cut to the chase– they will tell you the problem they are intending to fix, how they chose their method as the way to do it and give advice to you on how to charge into their field. The second interview is a deep dive where they will tell you what it really takes to be a game changer, how to define success and weather you’re cut out for being the lead change agent or if you should make the leaders casseroles (everyone needs to eat so there is no disgrace intended here).

These are interviews from people in global health, equine therapy, primary care, food security and everything else in between!

Stay tuned…eyes peeled….lovely things will enter your in-box next week.

* If you’re like–hey why haven’t you interviewed me? Then drop me a line info@turningpointpolicy.com and let’s see if we can make Skype magic!

Tool of Choice

I was certain that there was a moment in which I screamed at the top of my lungs “That’s it!” and picked up my pitchfork to make a change in the world. But I couldn’t really come up with one such instance. I could probably come up with a different event depending on the day and circumstance….What I know for sure is that it was born out of an intrinsic calling for social justice. But not wanting to miss out on a good story just because I have a bad memory–I surveyed my friends and asked them what my turning point was. They described me as sort of having a slow consciousness raising period during my college years which led to me choosing women’s health as my grounding point. I read a lot of books and shadowed a midwife. I went to nursing school became a squatter of sorts at CHOICE—whose midwives taught me so much about the breadth of women’s health and choices we make as clinicians. But there were also international experiences that shaped my ever-growing understanding of the trials and tribulations of the system in which we hang our hopes to save us. I went to Crow Creek moved to Colorado and Maryland, did health fairs and witnessed births and deaths and peri-menopause.

After some discussion, I began to wonder if it matters so much that I don’t remember a dramatic moment. Maybe my Turning Point was comprised of a million small observations about how women are both carved out of the larger health system (OB and peri-menopause) and constrained in a health system that generates lower health outcomes for women compared to men (heart disease, mental health, drug-reactions among others ).

Now that I think of it, my Turning Point is fused with what keeps my pitchfork raised. I read about all of these things (good and bad) and thought—there must be a shortage of people who are willing to help. I am a do-er after all. My pitchfork is not simply outrage but rather something to channel my force—my energy—my call for change.

Over time my Turning Point in awareness led to a devotion to the work. My devotion to making the system better.